Dan Stevens - photoshoot for The Independent, London, 2008

Dan Stevens pose on the movie set for ‘Hilde’ on August 15, 2008 in Huerth, Germany

Dan Stevens - The Turn of the Screw (2009)

Dan Stevens - The Line of Beauty(2006) trailer (x)

aliceleeeee:

THE NEW DRIVE? 

DOWNTON’S DAN STEVENS CHECKS IN AS THE GUEST

HAVING TRANSFORMED Step Up’s Sharni Vinson into a boobytrapping, head-blending maniac in You’re Next, director Adam Wingard has pulled another ace from Countercasting Central. For his next trick, The Guest, Wingard will turn Dan Stevens, aka Matthew Crawley from Downton Abbey, from Mr. Tea into Mr. T. “I’d just seen the first season of Downton with my dad over Thanksgiving,” says Wingard. “To be honest, he kinda forced me to sit down and watch it. But Dan made a real impression - he had that genteel, handsome-gent vibe perfect for this Southern guy I had in mind. Dan’s very charming and effortlessly likable - crucial qualities if you want your character to infiltrate a family.” That family are the Petersons, who, while mourning the loss of their soldier son, are visited by David, a mysterious stranger who claims to have been with him during his dying moments. “He ends up moving in and helping out each family member,” adds Wingard. “But as the story progresses, you realise his way of solving problems isn’t the most, uh, sane, and David isn’t quite who you think he is.” The result has been dubbed the next Drive, a demented action-horror hybrid of sci-fi, conspiracy thriller and gore-fest, with a twist so head-swivelling it caused an outbreak of the Linda Blairs at Sundance. Yet after You’re Next, Wingard had planned to shoot “a non-stop chase movie in South Korea”, only to see the project collapse. “I was still searching for a story when I put on a double feature of The Terminator and Halloween, and realised both those films encapsulated the kind of movie I wanted to make. I guess the heart of the movie is indebted to (Hitchcock’s) Shadow Of A Doubt, but the tone is this ’80s nostalgia wonderland.” A huge part of which is Steve Moore’s slow-frying synth score. “Steve got so obsessed,” says Wingard. “He ended up hunting down every bit of kit John Carpenter used for theHalloween III soundtrack.”And how about this for a twist? Wingard’s been building a Marvel-style universe on the sly. “In V/H/S/2, the eye experiment is by a military contractor called KPG. In You’re Next, the dad works for the same company. And in The Guest, KPG plays a pivotal role. Nobody’s picked up on it yet. Maybe when they see The Guest…” Wingard pauses. “Or, er, reads this.”

THE GUEST IS OUT THIS SUMMER 

- EMPIRE MAGAZINE MAY 2014

2048: Evolution of Dan Stevens Edition

thelonegrasshopper:

Just like all the other versions out there except he gets hotter and more buff as you play along. 

Enjoy!

(Hint: I put the tiles more or less in order so its easier to keep track of where you are.)

Dan Stevens - Sundance 2014 portraits

THE NEW DRIVE? 

DOWNTON’S DAN STEVENS CHECKS IN AS THE GUEST

HAVING TRANSFORMED Step Up’s Sharni Vinson into a boobytrapping, head-blending maniac in You’re Next, director Adam Wingard has pulled another ace from Countercasting Central. For his next trick, The Guest, Wingard will turn Dan Stevens, aka Matthew Crawley from Downton Abbey, from Mr. Tea into Mr. T. “I’d just seen the first season of Downton with my dad over Thanksgiving,” says Wingard. “To be honest, he kinda forced me to sit down and watch it. But Dan made a real impression - he had that genteel, handsome-gent vibe perfect for this Southern guy I had in mind. Dan’s very charming and effortlessly likable - crucial qualities if you want your character to infiltrate a family.” That family are the Petersons, who, while mourning the loss of their soldier son, are visited by David, a mysterious stranger who claims to have been with him during his dying moments. “He ends up moving in and helping out each family member,” adds Wingard. “But as the story progresses, you realise his way of solving problems isn’t the most, uh, sane, and David isn’t quite who you think he is.” The result has been dubbed the next Drive, a demented action-horror hybrid of sci-fi, conspiracy thriller and gore-fest, with a twist so head-swivelling it caused an outbreak of the Linda Blairs at Sundance. Yet after You’re Next, Wingard had planned to shoot “a non-stop chase movie in South Korea”, only to see the project collapse. “I was still searching for a story when I put on a double feature of The Terminator and Halloween, and realised both those films encapsulated the kind of movie I wanted to make. I guess the heart of the movie is indebted to (Hitchcock’s) Shadow Of A Doubt, but the tone is this ’80s nostalgia wonderland.” A huge part of which is Steve Moore’s slow-frying synth score. “Steve got so obsessed,” says Wingard. “He ended up hunting down every bit of kit John Carpenter used for theHalloween III soundtrack.”And how about this for a twist? Wingard’s been building a Marvel-style universe on the sly. “In V/H/S/2, the eye experiment is by a military contractor called KPG. In You’re Next, the dad works for the same company. And in The Guest, KPG plays a pivotal role. Nobody’s picked up on it yet. Maybe when they see The Guest…” Wingard pauses. “Or, er, reads this.”

THE GUEST IS OUT THIS SUMMER 

- EMPIRE MAGAZINE MAY 2014

darkblueyank:

When I first saw the photographs of Dan Stevens in the 2006 production of “Romans in Britain” I thought “Pfft! never heard of it, can’t be important, but isn’t it cute that he met his future wife backstage.” Was I ever wrong. I recently read about the play and the legal battle in Old Bailey that ensued when it was first produced in 2000. This is probably old news to you Brits and theatre buffs, but for anyone else out there like me who is not familiar with the story, it’s described in a 2005 Guardian article.
The play was commissioned by Peter Hall, who wanted a play about Northern Ireland. The play draws parallels between the Roman invasion of Britain and the British presence in northern Ireland. The scene that led to the legal brouhaha is one where a Roman centurion rapes (anal rape) a Druid priest. It’s not about romance or sex, it’s about power and subjugation. The simulated rape scene was enacted with full nudity in full light. Here’s the description of the first public preview -
"After the rape scene, the actors experienced a feeling in the theatre they had never known before. Boredom and walkouts are familiar reactions to performers, but this was a kind of catatonia: 900 people frozen in their seats, not reacting at all to what followed. The atmosphere was later compared to the night in London theatres when it was announced before curtain-up that JFK had died."
In legal proceedings propelled by morality campaigner Mary Whitehouse, the director was charged under the Sexual Offences Act of 1956. The prosecution case was eventually dropped, but not before the judge ruled that the 1956 Sexual Offences Act could be applied to theatre.
Fast-forward to 2005, when the play was being produced again. The Guardian article describes the casting of the druid (Marban) -
"Casting began in late October. [director] West expects the part of Marban to be hard to fill again. Some actors have pulled out of auditions after reading the script but others excitedly contacted the theatre after hearing about the revival."
I expect that Dan Stevens was familiar with the play and the legal case, since Hall was his mentor and he was friends with Rebecca Hall. I wonder if Hall urged him to audition for the part of the druid or if he went after the part on his own volition. Either way, hooray fearless Dan!
BTW in the revival the rape was staged in a pool of water - yes, a real pool was part of the stage set. Read all about the 2000 legal case; it’s amazing and you can’t make this kind of stuff up -
http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2005/oct28/theatre
http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2006/feb/09/theatre
http://musicomh.com/extra/theatre/the-romans-in-Britain-crucible-theatre-Sheffield

darkblueyank:

When I first saw the photographs of Dan Stevens in the 2006 production of “Romans in Britain” I thought “Pfft! never heard of it, can’t be important, but isn’t it cute that he met his future wife backstage.” Was I ever wrong. I recently read about the play and the legal battle in Old Bailey that ensued when it was first produced in 2000. This is probably old news to you Brits and theatre buffs, but for anyone else out there like me who is not familiar with the story, it’s described in a 2005 Guardian article.

The play was commissioned by Peter Hall, who wanted a play about Northern Ireland. The play draws parallels between the Roman invasion of Britain and the British presence in northern Ireland. The scene that led to the legal brouhaha is one where a Roman centurion rapes (anal rape) a Druid priest. It’s not about romance or sex, it’s about power and subjugation. The simulated rape scene was enacted with full nudity in full light. Here’s the description of the first public preview -

"After the rape scene, the actors experienced a feeling in the theatre they had never known before. Boredom and walkouts are familiar reactions to performers, but this was a kind of catatonia: 900 people frozen in their seats, not reacting at all to what followed. The atmosphere was later compared to the night in London theatres when it was announced before curtain-up that JFK had died."

In legal proceedings propelled by morality campaigner Mary Whitehouse, the director was charged under the Sexual Offences Act of 1956. The prosecution case was eventually dropped, but not before the judge ruled that the 1956 Sexual Offences Act could be applied to theatre.

Fast-forward to 2005, when the play was being produced again. The Guardian article describes the casting of the druid (Marban) -

"Casting began in late October. [director] West expects the part of Marban to be hard to fill again. Some actors have pulled out of auditions after reading the script but others excitedly contacted the theatre after hearing about the revival."

I expect that Dan Stevens was familiar with the play and the legal case, since Hall was his mentor and he was friends with Rebecca Hall. I wonder if Hall urged him to audition for the part of the druid or if he went after the part on his own volition. Either way, hooray fearless Dan!

BTW in the revival the rape was staged in a pool of water - yes, a real pool was part of the stage set. Read all about the 2000 legal case; it’s amazing and you can’t make this kind of stuff up -

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2005/oct28/theatre

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2006/feb/09/theatre

http://musicomh.com/extra/theatre/the-romans-in-Britain-crucible-theatre-Sheffield


The Guest is a winner because it plays with dark comedy but also the over the top nature of 80s action flicks, with a slight twinge for creepy thrillers. It’s a winning formula that Wingard and Barrett master perfectly. (…) 
Without Dan Stevens, I don’t think this picture works. The Downton Abbey star is perfect as David, mastering the duel personality needed for the role. He’s also got a ton of charisma, a bonafide star in the making. It’s his movie and he delivers on every single level. 
The Guest is one of the best times at the theater that you’ll have all year guaranteed. Let it indulge in all its pleasures and you’ll be rewarded. I can see it becoming one of the most rewatchable films in my collection. It’s that kind of awesome.
- Review: ‘The Guest’ [SXSW 2014]

The Guest is a winner because it plays with dark comedy but also the over the top nature of 80s action flicks, with a slight twinge for creepy thrillers. It’s a winning formula that Wingard and Barrett master perfectly. (…)

Without Dan Stevens, I don’t think this picture works. The Downton Abbey star is perfect as David, mastering the duel personality needed for the role. He’s also got a ton of charisma, a bonafide star in the making. It’s his movie and he delivers on every single level.

The Guest is one of the best times at the theater that you’ll have all year guaranteed. Let it indulge in all its pleasures and you’ll be rewarded. I can see it becoming one of the most rewatchable films in my collection. It’s that kind of awesome.

- Review: ‘The Guest’ [SXSW 2014]